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Posts Tagged "nonprofit"

Responding to Media Requests

By on Feb 24, 2016 in News | 0 comments

There is little greater than free positive press about your expertise and your business. If you’ve been engaging in proactive public relations such as pitching stories, putting out your own news and building relationships with journalists, inevitably the time will come when a journalist will contact you to help on their story. Whether it’s additional research in your field they need or a quote, it’s a great achievement for your efforts. But handling the media request correctly will be the difference between a one-time call and a long-term relationship. Here’s how to ensure that a relationship is established and maintained. Always respond quickly – Journalists are on deadlines. If you receive a request from a journalist for help on one of their stories, this is something you should make a priority. Some journalists will provide you with their deadline while others will just make the request for information. But it’s safe to assume they generally need the information as soon as possible. And it’s okay to follow-up and ask when they need the information. If you are not in a position to provide the information they need, definitely let them know. There are times when you just aren’t accessible because of travel or other pressing deadlines but all efforts should be made to get them what they need and on time, if possible. Either way, responding promptly is advised. They will definitely not be waiting for you to “get around to it” and will move on to another potential source. Respond to what’s asked – There is often a great desire once you have a journalist’s attention to bombard them with information. Don’t. There will be other opportunities down the road. Simply respond to their request with a quote or research or whatever they have asked. If you have a lot of information that could be provided, just pick the best and let them know you have additional information should they require it. Never provide information they have not asked for or pitch them additional information not relevant to their current story. Stay professional at all times and be a great resource. If you are, they are more likely to use you as a source again. Be a resource...

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What is Content Marketing?

By on Nov 2, 2015 in News | 0 comments

There is no denying that content marketing has taken over. More and more companies of all sizes and budgets are caring more about what they say, how they say it and to whom they say it. But what is content marketing really? Many of my clients come to me and know they need to put out content but most aren’t really sure where to start. Some still need to be convinced. There are many definitions about what content marketing is but simplified it’s a frame of reference shift from selling to informing and educating. It’s about creating and distributing relevant and valuable content to your audience. The goal is to drive consumer choices, educate and inform, and compel your audience to action. Instead of a focusing on selling and pitching your products and services, you’re helping to make your audience more intelligent and more informed, and in turn, your audience rewards you with their business and brand loyalty. You end up becoming a trusted go-to source for information and the by-product of that is selling your products and services. Many of my small business clients come to me lamenting the fact that they don’t have great stories to tell. Granted, nonprofit organizations have a wealth of readily available stories and content, often more so than businesses but the stories are still there. Often it’s just a matter of brainstorming ideas and having a solid strategy. Developing a solid content strategy is the first-step. From a simple starting strategy to something more complex, the below gives you the basics. Audience-Focused – Remember your content is about your audience and not about you. Think about relationship building. If all you did was talk about yourself, how far would you get in developing good relationships? Not very far usually. Define who your audience segments are and what they need to know about your industry or even information that effects their decision making. Your brand story – Most people don’t know your industry like you do. Whether you know it or not, you have many stories to tell. This phase of your strategy will help you determine what stories to tell. What kinds of information help to educate your audience about your industry...

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What’s Trending?

By on Aug 22, 2015 in News | 0 comments

One of the first questions clients ask me when we talk about their content is – How can we stay relevant? The second – How can we get the media interested in the stories we need to tell? These are two very important questions and the answers are easier than you would think. Read the News – Sometimes it’s just that simple. And if you aren’t following your industry’s news or the national news about topics related to your industry, then you already missed the first step in staying relevant. The title of this post says it all – What’s trending? Meaning what is everyone talking about related to your industry and are you a part of that conversation. If not, why not? Give Your Two Cents – Through creating content you can join the conversation. You can write and pitch stories with your own unique viewpoint about what’s being talked about in your industry. Do you agree? Disagree? Have another angle to add? Post the content to your website and share it via social media. Respond to other articles and get your name and business out there. Silence is your enemy. Know Your Research – What is the research from your field saying? What new studies are coming down the pike? Stay informed and keep up to date. The more you are in-the-know, the easier you can share information and be a resource and expert to your audience and the media. Be a Conversation Starter – Don’t sit back and wait for others to start the important dialogue. If there are related subjects in your field not being discussed and you think it’s important, start the conversation yourself and invite others to join you. Nothing positions you as a leader quicker than being in front of the story but you have to stay current in your industry to be relevant....

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After a Media Interview

By on Apr 28, 2015 in News | 0 comments

If you think your work is over once you’ve given a media interview, think again. A few perfect touches after the interview can ensure you make the most out of your media exposure and position you perfectly for future interviews. Follow up: Don’t forget to follow-up after the interview, especially if you promised to send additional information during the interview. Send a note or email and use this opportunity to say thank you and briefly reiterate any points you want to make clear. This is also the time you can briefly add in a point or two you might have forgotten, and let the journalist know you are available should they need additional information. Always let them know you are willing to further assist in this or any future story. While you may not hear back from the journalist, they won’t forget the gesture, and it leaves the door open for future contact. Share: Make sure to keep watch for the news segment or story to run. When it’s available, use this as another opportunity to keep your network informed. Post the link on your website and social media pages as well as include the coverage in your most recent press kit. If it’s a really compelling piece, send an email newsletter with the link and additional thoughts and comments on the story that’s relevant to your readership. Get Social: If you aren’t already, make sure you follow the journalist and the news outlet on Twitter and Facebook if their professional pages are available. Twitter is a great way to connect with journalists. Evaluate: The only way you’ll get better at media interviews is to really evaluate how you do from interview to interview. Remember what you did well and think about how you could improve upon areas that need improvement. Were you prepared? Could you have provided better research or information from your industry or organization? Were there questions you stumbled over or ones that should have been easier for you to answer? It’s okay, good media interviews take practice for even the most seasoned professional. Evaluate and keep...

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Success During a Media Interview

By on Mar 4, 2015 in News | 0 comments

There are several things during the interview that you can do to ensure that your message remains clear and you have a good successful interview. The most important thing to remember is to stay calm and be as articulate as possible. Answer each question honestly: While giving a media interview you should never use the phrase “no comment.” You must be truthful in your responses and answer each question or you will seem evasive. If there is a legitimate or pending legal reason for not answering a question, simply state that you cannot answer it and give the reason. If you do not know an answer, don’t make something up. Simply state that you will need to look up the information so you can provide the most factual data. Ask if you can email the information after the interview. Avoid Jargon: There is nothing worse when reading copy than trying to decipher industry jargon and acronyms. Neither have any place in a media interview. If your audience has to figure out what you’re talking about then they aren’t paying attention to your message. Speak clearly and plainly so a wide audience will be able to understand. Be Engaging: The more you can show interest and passion for the subject the more engaged you will seem. It’s okay to use stories and anecdotes to illustrate and simplify your points. These can make for good copy as well. Also remember that the journalist probably does not know as much as you about the topic so you should try to educate and provide information in an informative and engaging way. Control & Redirect: There can always be an uncomfortable question or two so be ready to redirect. Answer the question but follow it up with the redirect. “Yes, but the other thing to consider is…..” “What we really discovered is…..” “The lesson we learned…..” “Another important fact is…..” Emphasize key points: You’ll be saying a lot during the interview but to make sure your main points are made indicate through your words what’s most important. “The key point is….” “The most important thing to remember is…..” “What’s critical at this time….” “Our biggest impact has been…..” Nothing is Off the Record: This...

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