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Posts Tagged "thought leadership"

What’s Trending?

By on Aug 22, 2015 in News | 0 comments

One of the first questions clients ask me when we talk about their content is – How can we stay relevant? The second – How can we get the media interested in the stories we need to tell? These are two very important questions and the answers are easier than you would think. Read the News – Sometimes it’s just that simple. And if you aren’t following your industry’s news or the national news about topics related to your industry, then you already missed the first step in staying relevant. The title of this post says it all – What’s trending? Meaning what is everyone talking about related to your industry and are you a part of that conversation. If not, why not? Give Your Two Cents – Through creating content you can join the conversation. You can write and pitch stories with your own unique viewpoint about what’s being talked about in your industry. Do you agree? Disagree? Have another angle to add? Post the content to your website and share it via social media. Respond to other articles and get your name and business out there. Silence is your enemy. Know Your Research – What is the research from your field saying? What new studies are coming down the pike? Stay informed and keep up to date. The more you are in-the-know, the easier you can share information and be a resource and expert to your audience and the media. Be a Conversation Starter – Don’t sit back and wait for others to start the important dialogue. If there are related subjects in your field not being discussed and you think it’s important, start the conversation yourself and invite others to join you. Nothing positions you as a leader quicker than being in front of the story but you have to stay current in your industry to be relevant....

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The Business of Writing

By on Sep 24, 2014 in News | 0 comments

I was recently asked to give a presentation on the business of writing. The audience was freelance writers – some having been in the business several years and others newly starting out. The focus was how to create a successful writing business. The reality is there are a lot of ways freelance writers are undercut in the current market and struggle to actually make a living as a freelance writer. Unfortunately, there are many ways freelance writers undercut their own profession and their own work. That was the focus of my presentation. I’ve been in this business for quite a while and the last six years completely full-time. This is how I make my living. Here are the tips I presented. Remember it’s a business – I know that sounds simple enough but many freelance writers think of themselves in those terms only. They don’t give consideration to the fact that they are a business and along with that should come a level of professionalism. It means you present yourself and conduct yourself in a professional business manner at all times. There have been people that have said to me, “But we’re creatives, we can be more relaxed.” And my response to that is it depends on what is meant by relaxed. My clients invest in my work. In turn, I have a responsibility to them. I keep normal working business hours. Yes, I might have creativity strike at 10:00 at night but no one would know that. I am operational during the normal workday when most business people are operational. Emails and calls are professionally conducted. Just because I work from my home office, doesn’t mean there are constant interruptions or kids screaming in the background. Most clients wouldn’t know I work from a home office unless I tell them. It means I’m on time for everything. Phone meetings, in-person meetings and all deadlines. It means if I tell a potential client I’ll have a first draft to them by a specific date, that’s when they receive it. Proposals & Contracts – I also utilize cost proposals and contracts. I offer a free consultation. I find out what the client’s needs are and then provide a cost estimate...

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Thought Leadership

By on Aug 13, 2014 in News | 0 comments

Just about every copywriter I know, myself included, has a few words or phrases that clients want used in copy that makes them cringe every time they have to write them.  For me, one of the terms is “thought leader.” Now there is nothing inherently wrong with thought leadership other than it’s the latest in a series of marketing buzz terminology that seems to have an amorphous meaning and has been utilized so frequently by so many, that to me, the term has lost its power. What is thought leadership? Go to Google and do a search. You’ll find that the 20 year old term has various meanings depending on the site or person defining it. The general meaning is a person or firm that is an authority on a subject and their opinions are influential in their chosen field. Not a bad thing, right? The problem is many think it’s an interchangeable term with expert. People want to state that they are a thought leader in their bios and other marketing copy. But, they don’t want to expend the energy and time to back up their own claim. There is nothing worse than reading a person’s bio where they state they are a thought leader but there is absolutely no evidence of it. They have no new content on their website, they aren’t speaking at industry conferences, and they aren’t even putting out influential content. My recommendation has always been to stay away from marketing buzz words, and with this particular term, it really should be more of an action rather than a statement of fact. What do I mean? If you want to be a thought leader – don’t tell your audience, show them. Being a thought leader isn’t a state of being, but rather a state of acting. If you want to be known as a thought leader – leave it out of your copy and instead: Produce Influential Content Start a blog and produce your own content. Write articles for trade journals, magazines and industry news. You can even offer to write articles for industry newsletters. There are many ways to get your content out to a wider audience. But it takes time and commitment....

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